Videos


Click above or watch via YouTube, Vimeo, MP4, or WMV.

Employment Law This Week (Episode 98: Week of December 18, 2017) has released bonus footage of its interview with Nancy Gunzenhauser Popper, an Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

As Ms. Popper discusses, the year 2017 saw the passage of a slew of new state and local paid leave laws, many of which go beyond what is required under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Employers in these jurisdictions may find that their own policies are not in compliance with these new laws, even when they are more generous than what is required under the FMLA. New laws include amendments to the California Family Rights Act; universal paid leave in Washington, D.C.; and paid family leave in New York State.


Click above or watch via YouTube, Vimeo, MP4, or WMV.

Employment Law This Week (Episode 72: Week of May 15, 2017) has released bonus footage of its interview with Nancy L. Gunzenhauser, an Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

As Ms. Gunzenhauser discusses, out-of-state contractors could be liable for directing background checks on independent contractors in New York. Two workers were terminated after their criminal history was discovered during a background check. They worked for a New York company whose contract with a national company required their termination. The employees sued both companies under the New York State Human Rights Law. Addressing the law’s criminal history discrimination provision, the New York Court of Appeals held that only an employer can directly violate the statute. But an out-of-state company that requires a New York employer to discriminate against employees or applicants based on their convictions can be held liable as an aider and abettor.


Click above or watch via YouTube or Vimeo.

Employment Law This Week (Episode 27: Week of May 16, 2016) has released bonus footage of its interview with Nancy L. Gunzenhauser, an Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

As Ms. Gunzenhauser discusses, New York City announced new guidance for pregnant workers. Mayor Bill de Blasio and the Human Rights Commission have released new guidance that defines pregnancy protections under the City’s Human Rights Law. The publication gives examples of accommodations that should be made by employers and outlines what an employer must prove when denying an accommodation.