Recent Blog Posts

  • Our colleague Michael Kun, co-editor of this blog, shared his thoughts on various wage and hour issues in the publication of “7 Deadly Sins,”  which discusses FLSA violations that must be avoided to ensure compliance at your company, published by TSheets. Following is an excerpt: “The most common issues we see regarding meal and rest periods occur in states like California where state laws – rather than the FLSA – require that employees be provided those breaks at certain times during the day,... More
  • Claims that employees have been misclassified as independent contractors remain a focus for private plaintiffs and government agencies. Contracts that exert control over the business of another company may be a particularly fertile source of misclassification claims by plaintiffs seeking unpaid wages. Two recent suits arising from franchise agreements with Jani-King, described by the Third Circuit as “the world’s largest commercial cleaning franchisor,” demonstrate the potential liability that can arise under these circumstances. Wage Hour Division Sues Based on Misclassification of Franchisees Last... More
  • When: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Where: New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019 Epstein Becker Green’s Annual Workforce Management Briefing will focus on the latest developments in labor and employment law, including: Latest Developments from the NLRB Attracting and Retaining a Diverse Workforce ADA Website Compliance Trade Secrets and Non-Competes Managing and Administering Leave Policies New Overtime Rules Workplace Violence and Active-Shooter Situations Recordings in the Workplace Instilling Corporate Ethics This year, we welcome Marc Freedman and Jim Plunkett from the... More
  • A group of 21 states (“the States”) has filed a Complaint in the Eastern District of Texas challenging the new regulations from U.S. Department of Labor that re-define the white collar exemptions to the overtime requirements of the FLSA.  The States argue the DOL overstepped its authority by, among other things, establishing a new minimum salary threshold for those exemptions. Pursuant to the new regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor, effective December 1, 2016: the salary threshold for the executive, administrative,... More
  • In a “Tip of the Week” segment on Employment Law This Week, Will Hansen, Senior Vice President of Retirement Policy for The ERISA Industry Committee (ERIC), offers some advice on preparing a benefits program in advance of the Department of Labor’s overtime rule: “The Department of Labor’s Final Rule increasing the overtime exemption threshold to $47,476 dollars will not only have an impact on the wages an employee receives, but also the benefits that they receive. In advance of these changes taking effect... More
  • In May, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced its final rule to increase the minimum salary for white collar exemptions.  With little more than two months to go before that new rule takes effect on December 1, 2016, employers still have time to decide how to address those otherwise exempt employees whose current salaries would not satisfy the new rule by either increasing their salaries or converting them to non-exempt status. But some of those decisions may not be easy ones. ... More
  • Michael D. Thompson In Gonzalez v. Allied Concrete Industries, Inc., thirteen construction laborers filed suit in the Eastern District of New York.  The plaintiffs claimed they worked in excess of forty hours per week, but were not paid overtime in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the New York Labor Law. To obtain information regarding the plaintiffs’ activities during hours they claimed to have been working, the defendants sought an order compelling discovery of their ATM and cell phone records. ATM... More
  • Julie Badel Addressing an unusual set of facts, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia has dismissed a suit challenging an employer’s practice of retaining tips that customers give to valets. The plaintiff in Malivuk v. Ameripark, No. 1:15:cv-2570 WSD (N.D. Ga. 2016), alleged that she was promised an hourly wage plus tips but that her employer, who provided valet parking services, retained a portion of the tips. The defendant moved to dismiss the case because the plaintiff did... More
  • Featured on Employment Law This Week: Employers in the city of Chicago will soon be required to offer up to 40 hours of paid sick leave a year. The City Council unanimously approved the paid sick leave ordinance, which will apply to all individuals and businesses with at least one employee. Chicago will now join more than two dozen other U.S. cities that require employers to provide paid sick leave. The mayor is expected to sign the ordinance, which is scheduled to... More
  • Our colleagues Denise Merna Dadika and Brian W. Steinbach, attorneys in the Employment, Labor & Workforce Management practice at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Health Employment and Labor blog that will be of interest to many of our readers: “U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Review DOL Home Care Rule” Following is an excerpt: On Monday, June 27, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the new U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) requirement... More