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Recent Blog Posts

  • The Florida Supreme Court ruled last week that referral sources in the home healthcare industry can be protected legitimate business interests under the state law governing non-compete agreements, thus finding enforceable such a restriction on a former marketing employee who left for a competitor. Although the Florida statute in question (542.335) does not specifically list “referral sources” as one of the five categories of business interests subject to protection, the Court notes that those enumerated categories are prefaced by the phrase... More
  • We just published an article with the Practical Law Company discussing garden leave provisions in employment agreements. With PLC’s permission, we have attached it here.... More
  • When: Thursday, September 14, 2017 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Where: New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019 Epstein Becker Green’s Annual Workforce Management Briefing will focus on the latest developments in labor and employment law, including: Immigration Global Executive Compensation Artificial Intelligence Internal Cyber Threats Pay Equity People Analytics in Hiring Gig Economy Wage and Hour Paid and Unpaid Leave Trade Secret Misappropriation Ethics We will start the day with two morning Plenary Sessions. The first session is kicked off with Philip A. Miscimarra, Chairman... More
  • We just published a Practice Note with the Practical Law Company discussing litigation for employers whose employees have misappropriated trade secrets. With PLC’s permission, we have attached it here.... More
  • It is fairly uncommon for a circuit court to opine on the reasonableness of a restrictive covenant. In Ag Spectrum Co. v. Elder, No. 16-3113, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 14128 (8th Cir. Aug. 2, 2017), the Eighth Circuit issued a decision holding that an independent contractor’s non-compete was unreasonable and unenforceable. Applying Iowa law, the Eighth Circuit explained that reasonableness depends on the circumstances, including consideration of several factors such as: (1) the employee’s closeness to customers; (2) the employee’s peculiar... More
  • Featured on Employment Law This Week – An Illinois appellate court weighs in on social media and solicitation. The case involved a defendant who sent LinkedIn connection requests to three former coworkers, even though he had signed a non-solicit agreement. In considering whether social media activity violates non-solicitation agreements, other courts have drawn a distinction between passive social media activity and more active, direct activity. Though these requests were made directly to the former coworkers, the court in this case ruled... More
  • In a very thorough analysis following a 3 day Preliminary Injunction hearing Judge Jed Rakoff declined to issue injunctive relief to a former employer seeking to enjoin four former employees and their new employer from competing or from soliciting clients or employees. The decision is far ranging in the employee movement context touching upon inadvertent retention of confidential information, the propriety of new employers providing broad indemnifications and large signing bonuses to the recruits,  and the scope of allowable “preparatory... More
  • Nevada employers be advised: on June 3, 2017, Governor Brian Sandoval signed into law Assembly Bill 276, which amends Chapter 613 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and sets forth a new framework in which noncompetes are evaluated. The amended law includes the following four changes: A noncompete is void and unenforceable unless the noncompete: Is supported by valuable consideration; Does not impose any restraint that is greater than is required for the protection of the employer for whose benefit the restraint is imposed; Does... More
  • In this age of social media, a frequently asked question is whether social media activity can violate a non-compete or non-solicit.   Although the case law is evolving, courts which have addressed the issue have focused on the content of the communication, rather than the medium used to convey it.  In so doing, they have distinguished between mere passive social media activity (e.g., posting an update about a new job) as opposed to more targeted, active actions (e.g., not merely posting... More
  • A recent decision from the Northern District of California, Magic Leap, Inc. v. Bradski et. al., shows that employers must meet a high standard when filing a California Code of Civil Procedure Section 2019.210 disclosure statement under the California Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“CUTSA”). See California Civil Code § 3426 et seq. The disclosure statement, which does not have a counterpart in the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, requires a plaintiff to “identify the trade secret with reasonable particularity” before... More