OSHA’s Response to Compliance with the New Reporting Rules and What It Means to Employers

Risk Byte August 2015

Valerie Butera, a Member of the Firm in the Labor and Employment practice, in the firm’s Washington, DC, office, authored “OSHA’s Response to Compliance with the New Reporting Rules and What It Means to Employers,” published in Risk Byte, a HealthSouth newsletter.

Following is an excerpt:

When recording the findings of the root cause analysis, employers must be mindful to exclude hearsay or conjecture—the content of the report should be completely factual and should include as much of the following information as possible:

  • Background information, such as where and when the incident took place, who and what were involved, the victim’s role and actions, and everything learned from witness interviews
  • A full description of the incident, such as the sequence of events, the type of incident, any objects or machinery that were involved, and any unusual circumstances, such as adverse weather or equipment failure
  • An analysis of why the incident took place, based on everything that the employer discovered during the investigation
  • Recommended corrective actions that will prevent recurrences

Ms. Butera’s article originally appeared on OSHA Law Update, an Epstein Becker Green blog.