Videos


Click above or watch via YouTube, Vimeo, MP4, or WMV.

Employment Law This Week (Episode 73: Week of May 22, 2017) has released bonus footage of its interview with Kevin Sullivan, an Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

As Mr. Sullivan discusses, the California Supreme Court has clarified the state’s ambiguous “day of rest” provisions. The provisions state that, with certain exceptions, employers will not cause “employees to work more than six days in seven.” The state’s high court addressed three questions about this law that had been certified by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The court determined that employees are entitled to one day of rest per workweek. So, every Sunday marks the beginning of a new seven-day period. Additionally, the court clarified that employees who work six hours or less during each day of the week are not entitled to a day of rest and that employees can choose not to take the day of rest if they are fully aware of the entitlement.


Click above or watch via YouTube, Vimeo, MP4, or WMV.

Employment Law This Week (Episode 63: Week of March 13, 2017) has released bonus footage of its interview with Kevin Sullivan, an Associate at Epstein Becker Green.

As Mr. Sullivan discusses, California health care workers can still waive some breaks. In February 2015, a California appeals court invalidated an order from the Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) that allowed health care workers to waive certain meal breaks. The court found the order, which allowed the workers to miss one of their two meal periods when working over eight hours, was in direct conflict with the California Labor Code. The state legislature then passed a new law giving the IWC authority to craft exceptions going forward for health care workers. This month, the appeals court concluded that its 2015 decision was based on a misreading of the statute and that even waivers occurring before the new law are valid.